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Justice and Law: The One Hundred Year Rule

8 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2012  

William P. Quigley

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law

Date Written: September 26, 2012

Abstract

The author suggests a rule of thumb to use in the debate over law versus justice: laws are transient creations of man, while justice is eternal. The lack of women’s suffrage, wide-spread racial segregation, and other facts of daily life a hundred years ago were perfectly legal but are now viewed as intolerably unjust anachronisms of history. The author hopes that a hundred years from now the death penalty, economic inequality, homelessness and other social problems existing under our current legal system will similarly be viewed as historically unfathomable offenses against justice.

Keywords: law, justice, jurisprudence

Suggested Citation

Quigley, William P., Justice and Law: The One Hundred Year Rule (September 26, 2012). CUNY Law Review, Vol. 15, pp. 1, 2012; Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Research Paper No. 2012-25. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2187429

William P. Quigley (Contact Author)

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law ( email )

7214 St. Charles Ave., Box 901
Campus Box 901
New Orleans, LA 70118
United States

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