Obstacles to Optimal Policy: The Interplay of Politics and Economics in Shaping Bank Supervision and Regulation Reforms

61 Pages Posted: 22 Aug 2000

See all articles by Randall Kroszner

Randall Kroszner

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Philip E. Strahan

Boston College - Department of Finance; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: February 2000

Abstract

This paper provides a positive political economy analysis of the most important revision of the U.S. supervision and regulation system during the last two decades, the 1991 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act (FDICIA). We analyze the impact of private interest groups as well as political-institutional factors on the voting patterns on amendments related to FDICIA and its final passage to assess the empirical importance of different types of obstacles to welfare-enhancing reforms. Rivalry of interests within the industry (large versus small banks) and between industries (banks versus insurance) as well as measures of legislator ideology and partisanship play important roles and, hence, should be taken into account in order to implement successful change. A "divide and conquer" strategy with respect to the private interests appears to be effective in bringing about legislative reform. The concluding section draws tentative lessons from the political economy approaches about how to increase the likelihood of welfare-enhancing regulatory change.

JEL Classification: G21, G28

Suggested Citation

Kroszner, Randall and Strahan, Philip E., Obstacles to Optimal Policy: The Interplay of Politics and Economics in Shaping Bank Supervision and Regulation Reforms (February 2000). CRSP Working Paper No. 512, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=218889 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.218889

Randall Kroszner (Contact Author)

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Philip E. Strahan

Boston College - Department of Finance ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://www2.bc.edu/~strahan

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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