The Transnational NGO Study: Rationale, Sampling and Research Process

30 Pages Posted: 19 Dec 2012 Last revised: 20 Dec 2012

See all articles by Margaret G. Hermann

Margaret G. Hermann

Syracuse University - Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

Jesse D. Lecy

Arizona State University (ASU) - School of Public Affairs; Maxwell School of Syracuse University; Georgia State University - Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

George Mitchell

The City College of New York

Christiane Pagé

Syracuse University - Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

Paloma Raggo

Carleton University

Hans Peter Schmitz

University of San Diego

Lorena Viñuela

Syracuse University - Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs

Date Written: January 18, 2010

Abstract

Transnational NGOs (TNGOs) are increasingly visible and influential actors in global affairs. Although academics and the general public are today more aware of TNGO activity today than a decade ago, our understanding of how TNGO leaders understand their roles in global politics remains limited. Scholarship on this topic has often been driven by individual case studies focusing on successful campaigns within specific sectors. Although research on transnational NGOs is thriving, scholarship largely takes place within particular disciplinary traditions and rarely capitalizes on the strength of an interdisciplinary approach. In addressing these limitations, the TNGO Project focuses on a sample of 152 TNGOs registered in the United States and selected on the basis of size, sector and fiscal health. Researchers traveled the country to question TNGO leaders about governance, accountability, effectiveness, collaboration, communication, leadership and related issues and challenges. The interview protocol was informed by multiple disciplinary perspectives including social movements, not-for-profit management, epistemic communities, transnational activism, interest groups, organizational theory and communications. To facilitate both exploratory (inductive) and confirmatory (deductive) modes of inquiry, the open-ended interview responses were coded using computer aided qualitative data analysis software.

Suggested Citation

Hermann, Margaret G. and Lecy, Jesse D. and Mitchell, George and Pagé, Christiane and Raggo, Paloma and Schmitz, Hans Peter and Viñuela, Lorena, The Transnational NGO Study: Rationale, Sampling and Research Process (January 18, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2191090 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2191090

Margaret G. Hermann

Syracuse University - Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs ( email )

400 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
United States

Jesse D. Lecy

Arizona State University (ASU) - School of Public Affairs ( email )

Farmer Building 440G PO Box 872011
Tempe, AZ
United States

Maxwell School of Syracuse University ( email )

400 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
United States

Georgia State University - Andrew Young School of Policy Studies ( email )

Public Management and Policy
35 Broad Street, 6th Floor
Atlanta, GA 30303-3083
United States

George Mitchell (Contact Author)

The City College of New York ( email )

160 Convent Avenue
New York, NY 10031
United States

Christiane Pagé

Syracuse University - Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs ( email )

400 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
United States

Paloma Raggo

Carleton University ( email )

1125 colonel By Drive
Ottawa
Canada

Hans Peter Schmitz

University of San Diego ( email )

5998 Alcala Park
San Diego, CA 92110-2492
United States

Lorena Viñuela

Syracuse University - Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs ( email )

400 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244
United States

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