The Development of the Jewish Bible: Critical Reflections Upon the Concept of a 'Jewish Bible' and on the Idea of Its 'Development'

What is Bible? Edited by Karin Finsterbusch and Armin Lange, pp. 377-392, Peeters Publishers, 2012

20 Pages Posted: 28 Dec 2012

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

This chapter examines some of the assumptions that are typically employed when dealing with the development of the Hebrew Bible. The first part of the chapter is a critique of the very term "Jewish Bible." It points out some of the problems with the term and make a plaidoyer against being politically correct. The second part focuses on what it means to explain the "development" of the Hebrew Bible and suggests that diachronic analysis alone cannot fully explain its formation. In this author's view, proper understanding of the development of the Bible requires drawing upon intellectual and literary models more commonly associated with the period of the “reception of scripture” than with conventional composition history.

Keywords: Biblical Studies, Hebrew Bible, Reception History, Old Testament, New Testament, biblical exegesis, biblical literature, biblical canon, Dead Sea Scrolls, Second Temple Studies, Second Temple Judaism, Israelite Religion, Textual Criticism, Samaritan Pentateuch, biblical interpretation

Suggested Citation

Levinson, Bernard M., The Development of the Jewish Bible: Critical Reflections Upon the Concept of a 'Jewish Bible' and on the Idea of Its 'Development' (2012). What is Bible? Edited by Karin Finsterbusch and Armin Lange, pp. 377-392, Peeters Publishers, 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2194193

Bernard M. Levinson (Contact Author)

University of Minnesota ( email )

245 Nicholson Hall
216 Pillsbury Dr., SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0229
United States
612-625-4323 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://levinson.umn.edu/

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