Changing Narratives: Colonised Peoples and the Problem of Criminology

American Society of Criminology 68th Annual Conference, Chicago, 14-17 November 2012

Posted: 30 Dec 2012 Last revised: 18 Jul 2013

See all articles by Chris Cunneen

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney; University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences; James Cook University - Cairns Campus

Date Written: November 5, 2012

Abstract

The problem of criminology and for criminology is that it has never really developed a narrative founded in the experiences of colonisation. The founding narratives of criminology are essentially 19th century European and American industrialisation, consequent social problems and the institutional formations associated with the modern western political state within the metropolitan centres.The problem for contemporary criminology is that, as a general proposition it lacks the intellectual history and conceptual tools to approach such matters as Indigenous research methodologies, to develop convincing explanations for racialised criminalisation and incarceration, or to understand the intersection between political demands for recognition of human rights (such as self-determination) and legitimacy in the operation of criminal justice. The paper explores these issues.

Keywords: criminology, narratives, indigenous knowledges, postcolonial theory

Suggested Citation

Cunneen, Chris, Changing Narratives: Colonised Peoples and the Problem of Criminology (November 5, 2012). American Society of Criminology 68th Annual Conference, Chicago, 14-17 November 2012. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2194732

Chris Cunneen (Contact Author)

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

James Cook University - Cairns Campus ( email )

PO Box 6811
Cairns, Queensland 4870
Australia

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