Engaging Dissatisfied Retail Employees to Voice Promotive Ideas: The Role of Continuance Commitment

Journal of Retailing, 89(2), 207-218

12 Pages Posted: 5 Jan 2013 Last revised: 22 Apr 2013

Jeffrey Patrick Boichuk

University of Virginia - McIntire School of Commerce

Bulent Menguc

King's College, University of London - Department of Management

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

Retailers rely on employees’ promotive work-related ideas to spur service delivery innovations. Yet a well-established finding in the literature is that employees refrain from sharing such ideas when they are dissatisfied, and a mountain of evidence suggests that job dissatisfaction is an epidemic in the retail industry. The intuitive solution would be for supervisors to support these employees; by willfully listening to employees’ problems and providing help, supervisors could expect employees to voice their ideas. However, our results, from a field study and a controlled experiment, suggest that support should only be provided if a dissatisfied retail employee is also committed to his or her organization out of necessity. Otherwise, support ends up inducing levels of employee voice that are not significantly different than would be the case had the support been withheld, yielding the support a misallocation of effort.

Keywords: job dissatisfaction, retail employee voice, continuance commitment, internal marketing, employee engagement

Suggested Citation

Boichuk, Jeffrey Patrick and Menguc, Bulent, Engaging Dissatisfied Retail Employees to Voice Promotive Ideas: The Role of Continuance Commitment (2013). Journal of Retailing, 89(2), 207-218. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2196443

Jeffrey Patrick Boichuk (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - McIntire School of Commerce ( email )

P.O. Box 400173
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4173
United States

Bulent Menguc

King's College, University of London - Department of Management ( email )

Paper statistics

Downloads
118
Rank
194,173
Abstract Views
564