Winners and Losers: Creative Destruction and the Stock Market

72 Pages Posted: 5 Jan 2013

See all articles by Leonid Kogan

Leonid Kogan

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Sloan School of Management; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Dimitris Papanikolaou

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management - Department of Finance; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Noah Stoffman

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Finance

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: January 2013

Abstract

We develop a general equilibrium model of asset prices in which the benefits of technological innovation are distributed asymmetrically. Financial market participants do not capture all the economic rents resulting from innovative activity, even when they own shares in innovating firms. Economic gains from innovation accrue partly to the innovators, who cannot sell claims on the rents that their future ideas will generate. We show how the unequal distribution of gains from innovation can give rise to a high risk premium on the aggregate stock market, return comovement and average return differences among firms, and the failure of traditional representative-agent asset pricing models to account for cross-sectional differences in risk premia.

Suggested Citation

Kogan, Leonid and Papanikolaou, Dimitris and Stoffman, Noah, Winners and Losers: Creative Destruction and the Stock Market (January 2013). NBER Working Paper No. w18671. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2196736

Leonid Kogan (Contact Author)

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Sloan School of Management ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://web.mit.edu/lkogan2/www/

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Dimitris Papanikolaou

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management - Department of Finance ( email )

Evanston, IL 60208
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Noah Stoffman

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Finance ( email )

1309 E. 10th St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
United States
(812) 856-5664 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://kelley.iu.edu/nstoffma/

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