Punishment: Two Decades of Penal Expansionism and its Effects on Indigenous Imprisonment

Australian Indigenous Law Review, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 8-17, 2011

10 Pages Posted: 17 Jan 2013

See all articles by Chris Cunneen

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney; University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences; James Cook University - Cairns Campus

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

This article examines key political, ideological and institutional factors impacting upon the increase in Indigenous imprisonment rates in Australia over the last two decades since the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (RCADIC). Central issues explored include: the multidimensional and racialized nature of punishment and crime control, the use of imprisonment as a form of governance, the impact of neoliberalism on the reforms envisaged by the RCADIC.

Keywords: indigenous, imprisonment, royal commission into aboriginal deaths in custody, Australia

Suggested Citation

Cunneen, Chris, Punishment: Two Decades of Penal Expansionism and its Effects on Indigenous Imprisonment (2011). Australian Indigenous Law Review, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 8-17, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2201357

Chris Cunneen (Contact Author)

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

James Cook University - Cairns Campus ( email )

PO Box 6811
Cairns, Queensland 4870
Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
75
Abstract Views
485
rank
317,231
PlumX Metrics