The ‘Reasonable Basis to Proceed’ Threshold in the Kenya and Côte d’Ivoire Proprio Motu Investigation Decisions: The International Criminal Court's Lowest Evidentiary Standard?

(2013) 12(1) The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals 49-80

30 Pages Posted: 25 Jan 2013 Last revised: 1 May 2013

See all articles by Manuel J. Ventura

Manuel J. Ventura

Western Sydney University, School of Law; The Peace and Justice Initiative

Date Written: October 1, 2012

Abstract

Prior to the ICC Pre-Trial Chamber II’s decision authorizing a proprio motu investigation with respect to the situation in Kenya, the jurisprudence of the ICC indicated that there existed three broad evidentiary thresholds pursuant to the Rome Statute: ‘reasonable grounds to believe’ for the issuing of warrants of arrest or summons to appear, ‘substantial grounds to believe’ for the confirmation of charges, and ‘beyond reasonable doubt’ for a finding of guilt. However, the aforementioned decision held that there existed another: ‘reasonable basis to proceed’ for the authorizing of a proprio motu investigation. It further held that this was the lowest evidentiary threshold provided for in the Rome Statute – lower than that for the issuing of a summons to appear or an arrest warrant. This remained unquestioned in Pre-Trial Chamber III’s subsequent Côte d’Ivoire investigation authorization decision. This result was based primarily on the fact that at the preliminary examination phase, the Prosecutor cannot engage his full investigative powers. This article questions that conclusion on the basis that the standard offered by Pre-Trial Chamber II is, in substance, practically indistinguishable from that governing the issuing of an arrest warrant or a summons to appear and that the Prosecutor was able to satisfy it without engaging his full preliminary examination powers. It argues that instead, the standard should be the same for both. However, a distinction is maintained not because one standard is inherently lower than the other, but because of the different contexts in which they are applied. The critical element is evidence that ‘pins’ the crime(s) to an individual(s). Such evidence is not required when requesting authorization to commence a proprio motu investigation but it is crucial when seeking an arrest warrant or a summons to appear. Thus, applying the same evidentiary standard in both circumstances results in different evidentiary material depending on the absence or inclusion of this element. It is submitted that the Prosecutor’s full investigative powers are reserved to obtain exactly the more specific and narrow evidence that can justify the deprivation of a person’s liberty or to summon him or her to The Hague.

Keywords: International Criminal Court, Rome Statute, Article 15, Article 53(1)(a)-(c), preliminary examination, proprio motu investigation, investigative powers, evidentiary standard/threshold, reasonable basis to proceed, reasonable grounds to believe

JEL Classification: K14, K33, K41

Suggested Citation

Ventura, Manuel J., The ‘Reasonable Basis to Proceed’ Threshold in the Kenya and Côte d’Ivoire Proprio Motu Investigation Decisions: The International Criminal Court's Lowest Evidentiary Standard? (October 1, 2012). (2013) 12(1) The Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals 49-80, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2206680

Manuel J. Ventura (Contact Author)

Western Sydney University, School of Law ( email )

Locked Bag 1797
Penrith, NSW 2751
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.westernsydney.edu.au/staff_profiles/uws_profiles/mr_manuel_ventura

The Peace and Justice Initiative ( email )

The Hague
Netherlands

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