Cornucopia: The Pace of Economic Growth in the Twentieth Century

49 Pages Posted: 5 May 2000 Last revised: 1 Apr 2001

See all articles by J. Bradford DeLong

J. Bradford DeLong

University of California, Berkeley; Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: March 2000

Abstract

There is one central fact about the economic history of the twentieth century: above all, the century just past has been the century of increasing material wealth and economic productivity. No previous era and no previous economy has seen material wealth and productive potential grow at such a pace. The bulk of America's population today achieves standards of material comfort and capabilities that were beyond the reach of even the richest of previous centuries. Even lower middle-class households in relatively poor countries have today material standards of living that would make them, in many respects, the envy of the powerful and lordly of past centuries.

Suggested Citation

DeLong, James Bradford, Cornucopia: The Pace of Economic Growth in the Twentieth Century (March 2000). NBER Working Paper No. w7602, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=220811

James Bradford DeLong (Contact Author)

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