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Cash Transfers and Child Schooling: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation of the Role of Conditionality

57 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016  

Richard Akresh

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Damien de Walque

World Bank; World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

Harounan Kazianga

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater

Date Written: January 1, 2013

Abstract

The authors conduct a randomized experiment in rural Burkina Faso to estimate the impact of alternative cash transfer delivery mechanisms on education. The two-year pilot program randomly distributed cash transfers that were either conditional or unconditional. Families under the conditional schemes were required to have their children ages 7-15 enrolled in school and attending classes regularly. There were no such requirements under the unconditional programs. The results indicate that unconditional and conditional cash transfer programs have a similar impact increasing the enrollment of children who are traditionally favored by parents for school participation, including boys, older children, and higher ability children. However, the conditional transfers are significantly more effective than the unconditional transfers in improving the enrollment of "marginal children" who are initially less likely to go to school, such as girls, younger children, and lower ability children. Thus, conditionality plays a critical role in benefiting children who are less likely to receive investments from their parents.

Keywords: Youth and Governance, Primary Education, Street Children, Educational Sciences, Education For All

Suggested Citation

Akresh, Richard and de Walque, Damien and Kazianga, Harounan, Cash Transfers and Child Schooling: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation of the Role of Conditionality (January 1, 2013). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 6340. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2208344

Richard Akresh (Contact Author)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ( email )

601 E John St
Champaign, IL 61820
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Damien De Walque

World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

HOME PAGE: http://econ.worldbank.org/staff/ddewalque

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Harounan Kazianga

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater ( email )

Stillwater, OK 74078-0555
United States

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