Colleague Crowdsourcing: A Method for Incentivizing National Student Engagement and Large-N Data Collection

18 Pages Posted: 4 Feb 2013

See all articles by Amber E. Boydstun

Amber E. Boydstun

University of California, Davis

Rebecca A. Glazier

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Jessica T. Feezell

University of New Mexico - Department of Political Science

Timothy Jurka

University of California, Davis

Matthew Pietryka

Florida State University - Department of Political Science

Jack Reilly

University of California, Davis

Abstract

This paper details our participant recruitment efforts as part of a research project studying individual-level, real-time reactions to the 2012 presidential debates. As researchers interested in examining debate effects as conditioned by key variables such as party identification and race, we wanted a large and diverse sample of respondent data, well beyond what we would be able to achieve by drawing on student participants from any single campus. As educators, we wanted to take the opportunity of this study to engage students in the electoral process. Our solution: crowdsourcing the political science community. Using an incentive package including teaching materials and promised next-day preliminary results from our study, we encouraged colleagues across the country to register their classes, offering incentives in turn to their students for participating. Our crowdsourcing approach yielded a dataset large enough and diverse enough to support hypothesis testing across even rare combinations of variables, such as African American Republicans. What is more, of the nearly 5,000 students across the country who viewed the presidential debates as part of our study, there were surely many who otherwise would not have watched.  

Suggested Citation

Boydstun, Amber E. and Glazier, Rebecca A. and Feezell, Jessica T. and Jurka, Timothy and Pietryka, Matthew and Reilly, Jack, Colleague Crowdsourcing: A Method for Incentivizing National Student Engagement and Large-N Data Collection. APSA 2013 Teaching and Learning Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2210745 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2210745

Amber E. Boydstun

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
United States

Rebecca A. Glazier (Contact Author)

University of Arkansas at Little Rock ( email )

Little Rock, AR 72201
United States

Jessica T. Feezell

University of New Mexico - Department of Political Science ( email )

Albuquerque, NM
United States

Timothy Jurka

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
United States

Matthew Pietryka

Florida State University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Talahasse, FL 30306
United States

Jack Reilly

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
United States

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