The Arab Spring and Social Justice in China: Implications for Institutional Reform

11 Pages Posted: 5 Feb 2013

See all articles by Randall Peerenboom

Randall Peerenboom

La Trobe University - Faculty of Law and Management; Oxford University - Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

Date Written: February 5, 2013

Abstract

The Arab Spring and Jasmine Revolutions in the Middle East and Northern Africa led to considerable hope for some people that China would experience a similar political uprising and considerable anxiety for the ruling regime. While there are a number of significant differences between China and MENA countries, there are all also enough commonalities to justify concerns about political instability. Whether China will ultimately be able to avoid the fate of authoritarian regimes in MENA countries will turn on its ability to overcome a series of structural challenges. This article examines the conflict between the rising pressure for social justice and the ability of China's legal institutions to satisfy them.

Keywords: Democratic transition, law and development, good governance, institutions, rule of law, authoritarian regimes

Suggested Citation

Peerenboom, Randall, The Arab Spring and Social Justice in China: Implications for Institutional Reform (February 5, 2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2211913 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2211913

Randall Peerenboom (Contact Author)

La Trobe University - Faculty of Law and Management ( email )

Department of Economics and Finance
Victoria 3552, 3086
Australia

Oxford University - Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

St. Cross Building
St. Cross Road
Oxford, OX1 3UJ
United Kingdom

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