Long-Term Neighborhood Effects on Low-Income Families: Evidence from Moving to Opportunity

58 Pages Posted: 11 Feb 2013

See all articles by Jens Ludwig

Jens Ludwig

Georgetown University - Public Policy Institute (GPPI); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Greg J. Duncan

Northwestern University - Institute for Policy Research; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Lisa Gennetian

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Lawrence F. Katz

Harvard University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Ronald C. Kessler

Harvard Medical School

Jeffrey R. Kling

Government of the United States of America - Congressional Budget Office (CBO); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Lisa Sanbonmatsu

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: February 2013

Abstract

We examine long-term neighborhood effects on low-income families using data from the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) randomized housing-mobility experiment, which offered some public-housing families but not others the chance to move to less-disadvantaged neighborhoods. We show that 10-15 years after baseline MTO improves adult physical and mental health; has no detectable effect on economic outcomes, youth schooling and youth physical health; and mixed results by gender on other youth outcomes, with girls doing better on some measures and boys doing worse. Despite the somewhat mixed pattern of impacts on traditional behavioral outcomes, MTO moves substantially improve adult subjective well-being.

Suggested Citation

Ludwig, Jens and Duncan, Greg J. and Gennetian, Lisa and Katz, Lawrence F. and Kessler, Ronald C. and Kling, Jeffrey and Sanbonmatsu, Lisa, Long-Term Neighborhood Effects on Low-Income Families: Evidence from Moving to Opportunity (February 2013). NBER Working Paper No. w18772. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2214242

Jens Ludwig (Contact Author)

Georgetown University - Public Policy Institute (GPPI) ( email )

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Greg J. Duncan

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Lisa Gennetian

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Lawrence F. Katz

Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )

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Ronald C. Kessler

Harvard Medical School ( email )

Health Care Policy
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Jeffrey Kling

Government of the United States of America - Congressional Budget Office (CBO) ( email )

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Lisa Sanbonmatsu

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