Failure to Progress: A Renewed Call for American Indians and Alaskan Natives on the Federal Bench

58 The Federal Lawyer 6 (March/April 2011)

4 Pages Posted: 14 Feb 2013

See all articles by Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner

Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner

University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

In recent history, women and people of color are increasingly represented in the federal government, and the federal judiciary more specifically. Yet, despite this progress in the appointment, confirmation and election of women and racial minorities within the federal government, one notable void still remains. Even though American Indians and Alaskan Natives are the portion of the American population most significantly impacted by decisions of the federal judiciary, not a single American Indian or Alaskan Native currently serves as an active federal district court or circuit court of appeals judge. This brief article examines why a diverse federal bench is so crucial and states that American Indians and Alaskan Natives are underrepresented on the federal bench. The article concludes by calling for the appointment and confirmation of American Indians and Alaskan Native to the federal bench.

Keywords: American Indian, Indian, Native American, Alaskan Native, Native Alaskan, federal judiciary, diversity, federal judges, judges

Suggested Citation

Kronk Warner, Elizabeth Ann, Failure to Progress: A Renewed Call for American Indians and Alaskan Natives on the Federal Bench (2011). 58 The Federal Lawyer 6 (March/April 2011). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2217904

Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner (Contact Author)

University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )

383 S. University Street
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States

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