The Midwives Ordinance of Palestine, 1929: Historical Perspectives and Current Lessons

Nurs Inq 2010; 17(2):165-72

Posted: 26 Feb 2013

See all articles by Eyal Katvan

Eyal Katvan

College of Law and Business - Ramat Gan Law School

Nira Bartal

Independent

Date Written: February 25, 2013

Abstract

Until 1929, midwifery in Palestine was relatively open to anyone and only partially regulated by the 1918 Public Health Ordinance, legislated shortly after the beginning of British rule. This article describes the factors that guided the shaping of midwifery and suggests possible sources of inspiration for the British legislator in crafting the Midwives Ordinance in 1929, including American, local (Jews and Arabs), and British ones. The Midwives Ordinance reflects the adjustment of midwifery to changes in the society that evolved under the British Mandate. The ordinance shows how the modern midwife’s role contracted relative to the traditional one, in the context of social processes in other countries, east and west. This historical research project is based on interviews, archive documents and research literature. It analyzes the British interests in regulating midwifery, including the rationale of preserving public health and reducing infant mortality, against a background of political power struggles as well as cultural, social and professional diversity in Palestine (the tensions between the powers of doctors, nurses, and pharmacists).

Suggested Citation

Katvan, Eyal and Bartal, Nira, The Midwives Ordinance of Palestine, 1929: Historical Perspectives and Current Lessons (February 25, 2013). Nurs Inq 2010; 17(2):165-72. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2223915

Eyal Katvan (Contact Author)

College of Law and Business - Ramat Gan Law School ( email )

26 Ben-Gurion St.
Ramat Gan, 52275
Israel

Nira Bartal

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
192
PlumX Metrics