SSI for Disabled Immigrants: Why Do Ethnic Networks Matter?

Center for Retirement Research at Boston College Working Paper No. 2013-7

13 Pages Posted: 2 Mar 2013

See all articles by Delia Furtado

Delia Furtado

University of Connecticut - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Nikolaos Theodoropoulos

University of Cyprus

Date Written: February 1, 2013

Abstract

Immigrants residing among many people who share their ethnic background are especially likely to receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for a disability when they belong to high SSI take-up immigrant groups. After showing that this relationship cannot be fully explained by differences in health, we consider the likely sources of these network effects by separately examining their role in the decision to apply for SSI and, conditional on applying, their role in determining who ultimately receives benefits. Our results suggest that networks may increase the probability of applying for SSI despite minor disabilities, but it is unlikely that network effects are driven by egregious lies on applications.

Suggested Citation

Furtado, Delia and Theodoropoulos, Nikolaos, SSI for Disabled Immigrants: Why Do Ethnic Networks Matter? (February 1, 2013). Center for Retirement Research at Boston College Working Paper No. 2013-7, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2226648 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2226648

Delia Furtado (Contact Author)

University of Connecticut - Department of Economics ( email )

365 Fairfield Way, U-1063
Storrs, CT 06269-1063
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Nikolaos Theodoropoulos

University of Cyprus ( email )

CY-1678 Nicosia
Nicosia, Nicosia P.O. Box 2
Cyprus

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