Financial Integration and Asset Returns

37 Pages Posted: 4 May 2001

See all articles by Philippe Martin

Philippe Martin

Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées (ENPC) - Centre d'Enseignement et de Recherche en Analyse Socio-Economique (CERAS); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Hélène Rey

London Business School; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: November 1999

Abstract

The paper investigates the impact of financial integration on asset return, risk diversification and breadth of financial markets. We analyse a three-country macroeconomic model in which i) the number of financial assets is endogenous; ii) assets are imperfect substitutes; iii) cross-border asset trade entails some transaction costs; iv) the investment technology is indivisible. In such an environment, lower transaction costs between two financial markets translate into higher demand for assets issued on those markets, higher asset price and larger diversification. For the country left outside the integrated area, the welfare impact is ambiguous: it enjoys better risk diversification but faces an adverse movement in its financial terms of trade. When we endogenise financial market location, we find that financial integration benefits the largest economy of the integrated area. Only when transaction costs become very small does financial integration lead to relocation of markets in the smallest economy.

JEL Classification: F4, F12, G1, G12

Suggested Citation

Martin, Philippe and Rey, Helene, Financial Integration and Asset Returns (November 1999). CEPR Discussion Paper No. 2282. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=223077

Philippe Martin (Contact Author)

Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées (ENPC) - Centre d'Enseignement et de Recherche en Analyse Socio-Economique (CERAS) ( email )

28, rue des Saints-Peres
75007 Paris
France
+33 1 4313 6385 (Phone)
+33 1 4313 6382 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Helene Rey

London Business School ( email )

Sussex Place
Regent's Park
London, London NW1 4SA
United Kingdom

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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