Religious Constitutionalism in Egypt: A Case Study

Fletcher Forum of World Affairs, Vol. 37, p. 35, 2013

17 Pages Posted: 16 Mar 2013

See all articles by Mohamed Abdelaal

Mohamed Abdelaal

Alexandria University - Faculty of Law; Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Date Written: March 15, 2013

Abstract

Egypt is in the early phases of democratization. Following the Egyptian Revolution in 2011, which ended thirty years of repression under the regime of former President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians face the challenge of building a new Egypt. Among the most serious of these challenges is the rise of Islamists. A bitter battle is now raging between Islamists and Liberals regarding whether Egypt should be a religious country or a secular one. Article 2 of the Constitutional Declaration of 2011, which lists the principles of Islamic Sharia as the main source of legislation, plays a key role in this battle. The fact that Egypt has the largest Christian minority in the Arab world adds another dramatic dimension. With this in mind, this essay traces the historical roots of Article 2 and provides a critical analysis of its significance for Egyptian society.

Keywords: Egypt, Religious Constitutionalism, Islam, The 2011 Revolution

Suggested Citation

Abdelaal, Mohamed, Religious Constitutionalism in Egypt: A Case Study (March 15, 2013). Fletcher Forum of World Affairs, Vol. 37, p. 35, 2013, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2234205

Mohamed Abdelaal (Contact Author)

Alexandria University - Faculty of Law ( email )

Moustafa Mshrafa st.
Souter
Alexandria
Egypt

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law ( email )

530 West New York Street, Lawrence W. Inlow Hall
Indianapolis, IN Indiana 46202
United States

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