Artificial Photosynthesis as a Frontier Technology for Energy Sustainability

Energy Environ. Sci., The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013, DOI: 10.1039/c3ee40534f

3 Pages Posted: 26 Mar 2013  

Thomas Alured Faunce

Australian National University; Australian Research Council

Stenbjorn Styring

Uppsala University

Michael Wasielewski

Northwestern University

Gary Brudvig

Yale University

Bill Rutherford

Imperial College London

Johannes Messinger

University of Umea

Adam Lee

Cardiff University

Craig Hill

Emory University

Huub deGroot

Leiden University

Marc Fontecave

College de France

D. MacFarlane

Monash University

Ben Hankamer

University of Queensland

Daniel Nocera

University of Cambridge - MIT Institute

David Tiede

Argonne National Laboratory

Holger Dau

Free University of Berlin (FUB)

Warwick Hillier

Australian National University (ANU)

Lianzhou Wang

University of Queensland

Rose Amal

UNSW Australia Business School, School of Accounting

Date Written: March 5, 2013

Abstract

Humanity is on the threshold of a technological revolution that will allow all human structures across the earth to undertake photosynthesis more efficiently than plants; making zero carbon fuels by using solar energy to split water (as a cheap and abundant source of hydrogen) or other products from reduced atmospheric carbon dioxide. The development and global deployment of such artificial photosynthesis (AP) technology addresses three of humanity’s most urgent public policy challenges: to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, to increase fuel security and to provide a sustainable global economy and ecosystem. Yet, despite the considerable research being undertaken in this field and the incipient thrust to commercialization, AP remains largely unknown in energy and climate change public policy debates. Here we explore mechanisms for enhancing the policy and governance profile of this frontier technology for energy sustainability, even in the absence of a global project on artificial photosynthesis.

Keywords: artificial photosynthesis, solar fuels, solar energy, renewable energy, sustainability, nanotechnology

JEL Classification: R48, Q42, Q43, Q48, Q32, K33, K32

Suggested Citation

Faunce, Thomas Alured and Styring, Stenbjorn and Wasielewski, Michael and Brudvig, Gary and Rutherford, Bill and Messinger, Johannes and Lee, Adam and Hill, Craig and deGroot, Huub and Fontecave, Marc and MacFarlane, D. and Hankamer, Ben and Nocera, Daniel and Tiede, David and Dau, Holger and Hillier, Warwick and Wang, Lianzhou and Amal, Rose, Artificial Photosynthesis as a Frontier Technology for Energy Sustainability (March 5, 2013). Energy Environ. Sci., The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013, DOI: 10.1039/c3ee40534f. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2235961

Thomas Alured Faunce (Contact Author)

Australian National University ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
61 2 61253563 (Phone)

Australian Research Council

Canberra, ACT 0200
Australia

Stenbjorn Styring

Uppsala University ( email )

Michael Wasielewski

Northwestern University ( email )

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

Gary Brudvig

Yale University ( email )

New Haven, CT 06520
United States

Bill Rutherford

Imperial College London ( email )

South Kensington Campus
Exhibition Road
London, Greater London SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom

Johannes Messinger

University of Umea ( email )

Samhallsvetarhuset, Plan 2
Umea University
Umeå, SE 901 87
Sweden

Adam Lee

Cardiff University ( email )

Aberconway Building,
Colum Drive
Cardiff, CF10 3EU
United Kingdom

Craig Hill

Emory University ( email )

201 Dowman Drive
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States

Huub DeGroot

Leiden University ( email )

Postbus 9500
Leiden, 2300 RA
Netherlands

Marc Fontecave

College de France ( email )

11 Place Marcellin Berthelot
Paris, 75005
France

D. MacFarlane

Monash University ( email )

Wellington Road
Victoria, Roodepoort 3145
Australia

Ben Hankamer

University of Queensland ( email )

Australia

Daniel Nocera

University of Cambridge - MIT Institute ( email )

Cambridge
United Kingdom

David Tiede

Argonne National Laboratory ( email )

9700 S. Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439
United States

Holger Dau

Free University of Berlin (FUB) ( email )

Kaiserswerther Str. 16-18
Berlin, Berlin 14195
Germany

Warwick Hillier

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

Lianzhou Wang

University of Queensland ( email )

St Lucia
Brisbane, Queensland 4072
Australia

Rose Amal

UNSW Australia Business School, School of Accounting ( email )

Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

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