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Maghrebi Crossings: North African Authorship and the Media in France

Posted: 22 Mar 2013  

Kathryn Kleppinger

George Washington University - Department of Economics

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

Based on research recently completed for a book manuscript, this paper analyzes ways in which novels written by the children of North African immigrants to France (commonly called “beurs”) have been debated and discussed on mainstream television. With its rich heritage of literary programming on the airwaves, France is a fruitful domain of study. Authors are frequently invited to appear in interviews, and this medium is a crucial way for them to make a larger public aware of their work. Through close readings of both the novels under study as well as the ways in which they have been promoted on television, it becomes clear that the authors who are invited to make the rounds of interviews fulfill certain expectations: that they address contemporary sociopolitical concerns and that they offer some sort of “insider” perspective on these matters. These conversations thus reveal both the frames of reference used to understand the North African community in France as well as the ways in which these authors are situated in the literary field and in French society more broadly.

Suggested Citation

Kleppinger, Kathryn, Maghrebi Crossings: North African Authorship and the Media in France (2013). ASA 2013 Annual Meeting Paper . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2236963

Kathryn Kleppinger (Contact Author)

George Washington University - Department of Economics ( email )

No Address Available

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