The Digital Divide in Educating African-American Students and Workers

Princeton University IRS Working Paper No. 434

38 Pages Posted: 25 Apr 2000

See all articles by Alan B. Krueger

Alan B. Krueger

Princeton University - Industrial Relations Section; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: March 2000

Abstract

This paper uses data from the October Current Population Survey (CPS) School Enrollment Supplement in 1984, 1989, 1993 and 1997 to calculate the gap in computer use between African-American, Hispanic and White Students. Black students were 16 percentage points less likely than White students to use a computer in school in 1984, and only 6 percentage points less likely in 1997. The Hispanic-White gap in computer use is now larger than the Black-White gap in computer use. Differences in the use of the internet at school are also documented. Black and Hispanic students seem to lag behind in using the latest technology in school, and their teachers seem to lag behind in their preparation to use the latest technology. Potential causes of this digital divide are evaluated. Consequences of the digital divide are also considered.

JEL Classification: J24

Suggested Citation

Krueger, Alan B., The Digital Divide in Educating African-American Students and Workers (March 2000). Princeton University IRS Working Paper No. 434. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=223749 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.223749

Alan B. Krueger (Contact Author)

Princeton University - Industrial Relations Section ( email )

Princeton, NJ 08544-2098
United States
609-258-4046 (Phone)
609-258-2907 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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