The European Parliament and the Future of Comitology after Lisbon

22 Pages Posted: 13 Apr 2013

See all articles by Michael Kaeding

Michael Kaeding

University of Duisburg-Essen

Alan Hardacre

European Institute of Public Administration

Date Written: May 2013

Abstract

The history of comitology - the system of implementation committees that control the Commission in the execution of delegated powers - has been characterised by institutional tensions. The crux of these tensions has often been the role of the European Parliament and its quest to be granted powers equal to those of the Council. This process came to a head with the 2006 Comitology reform and the introduction of the regulatory procedure with scrutiny (RPS). After just over three years of experience with the RPS procedure, the Treaty of Lisbon has made it redundant through the creation of Delegated Acts (Article 290 TFEU). This article aims to evaluate the practical implications that Delegated Acts will entail for the Parliament, principally by using the experience with the RPS to better understand the challenges ahead. This analysis will be of interest to those following the study of comitology, formal and informal interÔÇÉinstitutional relations and also to practitioners who will have to work with Delegated Acts in the future.

Suggested Citation

Kaeding, Michael and Hardacre, Alan, The European Parliament and the Future of Comitology after Lisbon (May 2013). European Law Journal, Vol. 19, Issue 3, pp. 382-403, 2013, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2250238 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eulj.12029

Michael Kaeding

University of Duisburg-Essen

Lotharstrasse 1
Duisburg, 47048
Germany

Alan Hardacre

European Institute of Public Administration

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