Constitution Making in the 21st Century

International Review of Law, Vol. 4, 2012

U of Melbourne Legal Studies Research Paper No. 630

19 Pages Posted: 17 Apr 2013

See all articles by Cheryl Saunders

Cheryl Saunders

University of Melbourne - Law School

Date Written: April 16, 2013

Abstract

Constitutions have been made or changed in major ways in more than half the countries of the world in recent decades. This article deals with contemporary approaches to constitution-making, organising the analysis around three key phases: setting the agenda, in terms of both substance and process; design, drafting and approval; and implementation. It argues that, while all constitution-making processes are different, there are some distinctive features of constitution-making in the 21st century that include popular participation, the need to build trust, internationalisation in its various forms and the importance of process. The article canvasses examples of constitution-making practices that have been or are likely to be influential. It identifies and briefly explores some of the key tensions in constitution-making between, for example, international involvement and domestic ownership of a Constitution and public participation and leadership.

Keywords: constitutions, constitution-making, comparative, participation

JEL Classification: K00, K19

Suggested Citation

Saunders, Cheryl Anne, Constitution Making in the 21st Century (April 16, 2013). International Review of Law, Vol. 4, 2012; U of Melbourne Legal Studies Research Paper No. 630. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2252294

Cheryl Anne Saunders (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - Law School ( email )

Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies 723 Swanston Street (2nd Floor)
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia
61 3 8344 0753 (Phone)
61 3 8344 9374 (Fax)

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