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What Could Globalization Mean for Domestic Islamic-Socio-Political Activism?

36 Fordham International Law Journal 600 (Symposium Issue, 2013)

4 Pages Posted: 19 Apr 2013  

Nina J. Crimm

St. John's University - School of Law

Date Written: April 2013

Abstract

As a result of globalization, a spectrum of Islamic believers, ranging from moderate reformers to radical extremists, is involved in a religious-socio-political awakening that is bound to have tremendous consequences for the global world. Islamic socio-political activism, recently quite present abroad, is not reserved for foreign realms. On the domestic front, US policymakers are considering a dramatic shift in US foreign policy in response to the Muslim Brotherhood’s new political power in places such as Egypt. Such a change, along with other conditions - some seemingly stagnant and others rapidly evolving - might newly spur Muslim Americans, their leaders, and the charitable sector to mobilize for alterations to US post-9/11 domestic policies, laws, and government actions. Modifications could address the policies that problematically have alienated many Muslim Americans, chilled Muslim Americans’ philanthropy, hurt US-based Islamic charities, and blocked aid to needy Muslims abroad, tarnishing the reputation of the United States as a result. Assisted by contemporary communicative technologies, new Islamic socio-political activism in the United States could bring not only domestic and worldwide attention to these injuries, but also improvements and perhaps even remedies.

Suggested Citation

Crimm, Nina J., What Could Globalization Mean for Domestic Islamic-Socio-Political Activism? (April 2013). 36 Fordham International Law Journal 600 (Symposium Issue, 2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2253966

Nina J. Crimm (Contact Author)

St. John's University - School of Law ( email )

8000 Utopia Parkway
Jamaica, NY 11439
United States

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