South African Heritage Policy and the Consequences for KhoiSan Rock Art: A National Question?

16 Pages Posted: 21 Apr 2013  

Scott Timcke

University of the West Indies (Saint Augustine)

Date Written: April 21, 2013

Abstract

Since the end of Apartheid, the South African heritage sector has undergone a significant transformation. Taking a lead from the 1996 National Constitution this transformation has attempted to create an inclusive framework in which multiple cultural groupings could entrench security for their particular practices and heritages. This paper argues that such a goal has not been uniformly realised. While heritage and cultural practices are protected as human rights under the 1996 Constitution in a resource constrained environment they assume the character of political interests malleable to use for political vantage. This is considered a failure of both the national and provincial heritage policy formulation process and its implementation. Specific attention to the neglect of KhoiSan rock art is given in order to support the above argument.

Keywords: Heritage Policy, Post-Apartheid South Africa, Iconography, State Symbols, KhoiSan

Suggested Citation

Timcke, Scott, South African Heritage Policy and the Consequences for KhoiSan Rock Art: A National Question? (April 21, 2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2254463 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2254463

Scott Timcke (Contact Author)

University of the West Indies (Saint Augustine) ( email )

Saint Augustine
Trinidad and Tobago

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