Within Group "Structural" Tests of Labor-Market Discrimination: A Study of Persons with Serious Disabilities

23 Pages Posted: 10 Jun 2000 Last revised: 5 Oct 2010

See all articles by David S. Salkever

David S. Salkever

UMBC, Department of Public Policy

Marisa E. Domino

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Date Written: February 1997

Abstract

Labor-market discrimination measures are usually derived from between-group comparisons of market outcomes for favored vs. disfavored groups, controlling for productivity-related individual characteristics. When the disfavored group is heterogeneous, one can relate variations in discrimination intensity to market outcomes within the disfavored group. We use this approach to test for employment and wage discrimination against persons with various types of disabilities. Measures of social distance' controls for the intensity of discrimination. In a national sample of adults with serious disabilities, employment discrimination effects are in the wrong' direction, however, and wage effects are unstable. Thus, variability in labor market outcomes among different types of disabilities is not explained well by variations in discrimination intensity correlated with social distance and employer attitudes. We conjecture that differences in available support services by type of disability may help to explain this variability.

Suggested Citation

Salkever, David S. and Domino, Marisa E., Within Group "Structural" Tests of Labor-Market Discrimination: A Study of Persons with Serious Disabilities (February 1997). NBER Working Paper No. w5931. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=225712

David S. Salkever (Contact Author)

UMBC, Department of Public Policy ( email )

1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

Marisa E. Domino

Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health

624 N. Broadway
Department of Health Policy and Management
Baltimore, MD 21205
United States

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