Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Consumption: Is There Really a Gateway Effect?

46 Pages Posted: 10 Jul 2000 Last revised: 4 Apr 2008

See all articles by Rosalie Liccardo Pacula

Rosalie Liccardo Pacula

University of Southern California - Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: January 1998

Abstract

This research analyzes the contemporaneous and intertemporal relationship between the demands for alcohol and marijuana by youths and young adults. A general theory of multi-commodity habit formation is developed and tested using data from the 1983-1984 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. An Adjusted Tobit specification is employed for estimating the empirical model. Habit persistence is distinguished from unobserved heterogeneity through a reduced form instrumental variable technique. The results show that higher beer prices significantly reduce the demand for both alcohol and marijuana, indicating a contemporaneous complementarity between these two substances even after controlling for commodity-specific habit formation. Further, prior use of alcohol and cigarettes significantly increases the likelihood of currently using marijuana, providing evidence in support of the gateway hypothesis.

Suggested Citation

Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo, Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Consumption: Is There Really a Gateway Effect? (January 1998). NBER Working Paper No. w6348. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=226099

Rosalie Liccardo Pacula (Contact Author)

University of Southern California - Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics ( email )

635 Downey Way
Los Angeles, CA 90089-3333
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
65
Abstract Views
2,255
rank
366,112
PlumX Metrics