Does Cultural Origin Affect Saving Behavior? Evidence from Immigrants

25 Pages Posted: 14 Aug 2000

See all articles by Christopher D. Carroll

Christopher D. Carroll

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Byung-Kun Rhee

Kyungsung University

Changyong Rhee

Asian Development Bank

Date Written: May 1998

Abstract

Because efforts to explain international saving differentials using traditional economic variables have not been very successful (Bosworth, 1993), some economists have proposed that national saving differences reflect cultural differences. We attempt to test that hypothesis by using data from the US Census to examine whether immigrants to the US from high-saving countries tend to save more than immigrants from low-saving countries. While we do find highly statistically significant differences in immigrants' saving behavior by country of origin, those differences do not match up with the differences in national saving rates. In particular, immigrants from high-saving Asian countries do not save more than other immigrants.

Suggested Citation

Carroll, Christopher D. and Rhee, Byung-Kun and Rhee, Changyong, Does Cultural Origin Affect Saving Behavior? Evidence from Immigrants (May 1998). NBER Working Paper No. w6568, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=226301

Christopher D. Carroll (Contact Author)

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Economics ( email )

3400 Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218-2685
United States
410-516-7602 (Phone)
303-845-7533 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Byung-Kun Rhee

Kyungsung University

Won-building 6th floor
Yumri-dong Mapo-ku
Seoul
Korea (ROK)

Changyong Rhee

Asian Development Bank ( email )

6 ADB Avenue, Mandaluyong City 1550
Metro Manila
Philippines

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
30
Abstract Views
1,306
PlumX Metrics