Wage Claims in the British Private Sector: 1979–2003

20 Pages Posted: 21 May 2013

See all articles by Peter Ingram

Peter Ingram

University of Surrey

Neil Rickman

University of Surrey - Department of Economics

Jonathan Wadsworth

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Economic Performance (CEP); IZA Institute of Labor Economics; William Davidson Institute; Royal Holloway College University of London

Date Written: May 2013

Abstract

Wage claims have been an important feature of British industrial relations during the postwar period. They help set the boundaries within which wage negotiations take place and provide an insight into the conduct of negotiations, especially during periods of change in industrial relations. Despite this, claims remain an underinvestigated area. This article provides a unique investigation of the dimensions of wage claims over a period of free collective bargaining. The number of wage claims declined along with unionisation but, over a period of economic turbulence, the conduct of British wage setting began to change. We examine data on claims and investigate the influences on changes in those claims over time. We find that external factors (inflation, unemployment and legislative control of unions) were more prominent in shaping the development of claims than changes in the composition of groups who continued to post claims.

Suggested Citation

Ingram, Peter and Rickman, Neil and Wadsworth, Jonathan, Wage Claims in the British Private Sector: 1979–2003 (May 2013). Industrial Relations Journal, Vol. 44, Issue 3, pp. 296-315, 2013, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2267675 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/irj.12019

Peter Ingram (Contact Author)

University of Surrey ( email )

Guildford
Guildford, Surrey GU2 5XH
United Kingdom

Neil Rickman

University of Surrey - Department of Economics ( email )

Guildford
Surrey GU2 7XH
United Kingdom
+44 1483 689 923 (Phone)
+44 1483 689 548 (Fax)

Jonathan Wadsworth

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
England

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

William Davidson Institute

724 E. University Ave.
Wyly Hall
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1234
United States

Royal Holloway College University of London

Senate House
Malet Street
London, TW20 0EX
United Kingdom

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