Are White Lies as Innocuous as We Think?

Posted: 23 May 2013 Last revised: 25 May 2013

See all articles by Jennifer Argo

Jennifer Argo

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law

Baba Shiv

Stanford University - Stanford Graduate School of Business

Date Written: July 22, 2010

Abstract

This research examines the implications of telling an “innocent” white lie after a negative interpersonal encounter. We propose that if a white lie falls outside an acceptable range of dishonesty, cognitive dissonance will arise and produce negative affect. Deceivers will then be motivated to reduce the dissonance and will do so by engaging in behaviors that favor the wrongdoer with potentially negative consequences for the self. We test our conceptualization across three studies. In study 1, we explore the impact of one factor that determines whether a white lie falls outside the acceptable range of dishonesty — the salience of the norm of honesty. In studies 2 and 3, we examine the role of two factors, affect certainty and source certainty, that are predicted to moderate the impact of the negative affect on deceiver’s downstream judgments and behaviors toward the target of the white lie.

Suggested Citation

Argo, Jennifer and Shiv, Baba, Are White Lies as Innocuous as We Think? (July 22, 2010). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 38, No. 6, 2012; University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-302. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2268751

Jennifer Argo (Contact Author)

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada

Baba Shiv

Stanford University - Stanford Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

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