What's in a Concept? Global Public Goods, International Law, and Legitimacy

23 Eur. J. Int'l L. 651 (2012)

18 Pages Posted: 26 May 2013 Last revised: 31 Oct 2013

See all articles by Daniel Bodansky

Daniel Bodansky

Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

Date Written: January 1, 2012

Abstract

Although the terminology of global public goods may be new to international law scholarship, many of the principal features and implications of global public goods are familiar: global public goods are externalities writ large; they create incentives to free ride; and in many cases, they require international governance to provide. Nevertheless, the global public goods literature has been valuable in highlighting that global public goods come in different types, with different ‘production technologies’. Some depend on the aggregate effort of the entire group, while others depend on a ‘single best effort’ or on the ‘weakest link’. These different types of global public goods raise different governance issues and hence different challenges for international law.

Keywords: International law, global public goods, legitimacy

JEL Classification: K32, K33

Suggested Citation

Bodansky, Daniel, What's in a Concept? Global Public Goods, International Law, and Legitimacy (January 1, 2012). 23 Eur. J. Int'l L. 651 (2012). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2270339

Daniel Bodansky (Contact Author)

Arizona State University Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law ( email )

111 E Taylor St
Phoenix, AZ 85004
United States

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