The Role of the State in International Adoption Cases No Longer Serves the Best Interests of Adoptable Children, but Instead Functions as a Tool to Discourage Those Wishing to Adopt

5 Pages Posted: 27 May 2013

See all articles by Temitope Stephen

Temitope Stephen

University of East London - School of Law

Date Written: May 27, 2013

Abstract

The guiding principles of international adoptions as stated by The Hague Adoption Convention of 1993 are consent, best interest of the child and recognition.

Adoption is a legal and social process through which a child becomes a part of a new family. It is intended to provide the child with permanence and security and is a life long process that requires commitment, patience and skill.

My approach to the topic is to address the total concept of adoption, the parties involved and the salient issues to determine why the state regulates international adoption, and if the state regulation is constituting more problems than good.

Relevant case laws and literatures will be consulted in this paper.

Suggested Citation

Stephen, Temitope, The Role of the State in International Adoption Cases No Longer Serves the Best Interests of Adoptable Children, but Instead Functions as a Tool to Discourage Those Wishing to Adopt (May 27, 2013). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2270498 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2270498

Temitope Stephen (Contact Author)

University of East London - School of Law ( email )

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Nigeria
08137009353 (Phone)

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