Job Security and Work Force Adjustment: How Different are U.S. And Japanese Practices?

38 Pages Posted: 14 Jul 2000 Last revised: 16 Aug 2021

See all articles by Katharine G. Abraham

Katharine G. Abraham

University of Maryland - Joint Program in Survey Methodology and Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Susan N. Houseman

W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research

Date Written: November 1989

Abstract

This paper compares employment and hours adjustment in Japanese and U.S. manufacturing. In contrast to some previous work, we find that adjustment of total labor input to demand changes is significantly greater in the United States than in Japan; adjustment of employment is significantly greater in the United States, while that of average hours is about the same in the two countries. Although workers in Japan enjoy greater employment stability than do U.S. workers, we find considerable variability in the adjustment patterns across groups within each country. In the United States, most of the adjustment is borne by production workers. In Japan, female workers, in particular, bear a disproportionate share of adjustment.

Suggested Citation

Abraham, Katharine G. and Houseman, Susan N., Job Security and Work Force Adjustment: How Different are U.S. And Japanese Practices? (November 1989). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=227298

Katharine G. Abraham (Contact Author)

University of Maryland - Joint Program in Survey Methodology and Department of Economics ( email )

College Park, MD 20742
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Susan N. Houseman

W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research ( email )

300 South Westnedge Avenue
Kalamazoo, MI 49007-4686
United States

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