Were 1990s Labour Markets Really Different?

University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-290

Policy Options, Vol. 21 (6), 2000, pp. 15-26

Posted: 5 Jun 2013

See all articles by Alice Orcutt Nakamura

Alice Orcutt Nakamura

University of Alberta - School of Business

Garnett Picot

Statistics Canada

Andrew Heisz

Government of Canada - Analytical Studies Branch

Date Written: June 6, 1999

Abstract

In the early 1990s, observers of the labour market often pointed to emerging new phenomena. How many of these trends have survived the strong economic expansion of 1997 to 1999? The rise of self-employment, which was thought to result from a decline in full-time paid employment, has continued through the buoyant labour market of recent years. Job tenure has risen, not fallen, and the number of firms people can reasonably expect to work for over their career is, as a result, lower, not higher. The participation and employment rates of younger workers have remained below their former peaks, but this seems mainly due to more young people staying in school. Finally, quit rates remain lower than might be expected at this point in the economic cycle, a fact which may reflect increased employment anxiety, despite the low unemployment rate.

Suggested Citation

Nakamura, Alice Orcutt and Picot, Garnett and Heisz, Andrew, Were 1990s Labour Markets Really Different? (June 6, 1999). University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-290. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2273846

Alice Orcutt Nakamura (Contact Author)

University of Alberta - School of Business ( email )

2-32C Business Building
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada

Garnett Picot

Statistics Canada ( email )

Ottawa, Ontario
Canada
613-951-8214 (Phone)
613-951-5403 (Fax)

Andrew Heisz

Government of Canada - Analytical Studies Branch ( email )

120 Parkdale Avenue
24th Floor, R.H. Coats Building
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6
Canada
613-951-3748 (Phone)
613-951-5403 (Fax)

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