Development and Validation of an Eating Norms Inventory: Americans' Lay-Beliefs About Appropriate Eating

13 Pages Posted: 5 Jun 2013 Last revised: 29 Aug 2014

See all articles by Robert Fisher

Robert Fisher

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law

Laurette Dube

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

What do American adults believe about what, where, when, how much, and how often it is appropriate to eat? Such normative beliefs originate from family and friends through socialization processes, but they are also influenced by governments, educational institutions, and businesses. Norms therefore provide an important link between the social environment and individual attitudes and behaviors. This paper reports on five studies that identify, develop, and validate measures of normative beliefs about eating. In study 1 we use an inductive method to identify what American adults believe are appropriate or desirable eating behaviors. Studies 2 and 3 are used to purify and assess the discriminant and nomological validity of the proposed set of 18 unidimensional eating norms. Study 4 assesses predictive validity and finds that acting in a norm-consistent fashion is associated with lower Body Mass Index (BMI), and greater body satisfaction and subjective health. Study 5 assesses the underlying social desirability and perceived healthiness of the norms.

Suggested Citation

Fisher, Robert and Dube, Laurette, Development and Validation of an Eating Norms Inventory: Americans' Lay-Beliefs About Appropriate Eating (2010). Appetite, 2011 Oct. 57(2):365-76; University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-367. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2274417

Robert Fisher (Contact Author)

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada

Laurette Dube

McGill University - Desautels Faculty of Management ( email )

1001 Sherbrooke St. West
Montreal, Quebec H3A1G5 H3A 2M1
Canada
514-398-4026 (Phone)
514-398-3876 (Fax)

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