Rethinking Juvenile Justice in the Wake of Katrina

CH. 5, CHILDREN, LAW, AND DISASTERS: WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED FROM KATRINA AND THE HURRICANES OF 2005, at 113 (2009)

Tulane Public Law Research Paper

30 Pages Posted: 11 Jun 2013

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

There are several proposals and ideas worth being presented in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf Coast disaster. Two of these are broadly defined approaches to changing juvenile justice: first using evidence-based approaches to identify and retain current intervention programs and strategies that appear to work and, second rethinking juvenile justice as a public health problem in hopes of entertaining early-intervention services for high-risk juveniles and adopting universal day care as a mechanism to reduce delinquency and recidivism rates for young offenders.

We should acknowledge that certain components of the present juvenile justice system should pass scrutiny and remain intact. However, there are myriad problems that even well-funded state delinquency systems exhibit. Katrina only helped highlight the many shortcomings of the New Orleans delinquency system.

Keywords: Hurricane Katrina, Juvenile, Juvenile Justice

Suggested Citation

Katner, David R., Rethinking Juvenile Justice in the Wake of Katrina (2009). CH. 5, CHILDREN, LAW, AND DISASTERS: WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED FROM KATRINA AND THE HURRICANES OF 2005, at 113 (2009), Tulane Public Law Research Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2274701

David R. Katner (Contact Author)

Tulane University - Law School ( email )

New Orleans, LA 70118
United States
504-865-5153 (Phone)

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