Unequal Returns: Gender Differences in Initial Employment among University Graduates

Canadian Journal of Higher Education Vol 23. Issue 1. Year 1993. Page: 37-55

University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-565

20 Pages Posted: 12 Jun 2013  

Karen D. Hughes

University of Alberta - Department of Strategic Management and Organization

Graham Lowe

University of Alberta - Department of Sociology

Date Written: April 1, 1992

Abstract

This paper examines how socio-demographic, educational, work attitude, and labour market characteristics contribute to gender differences in the earnings and promotion opportunities of 1985 university graduates employed full-time one year after graduating. Even after accounting for the effects of faculty of enrollment, gender differences in initial employment outcomes are attributable to gender-segregated labour market structures, union and professional association membership, and specific job conditions. Thus, men and women graduating from the same faculty and university translate credentials into different kinds of employment futures. Interestingly, wanting a job with good promotion opportunities at the time of graduation increased the chance of finding such a job, regardless of sex. This paper concludes by exploring the theoretical and policy implications of these findings.

Suggested Citation

Hughes, Karen D. and Lowe, Graham, Unequal Returns: Gender Differences in Initial Employment among University Graduates (April 1, 1992). Canadian Journal of Higher Education Vol 23. Issue 1. Year 1993. Page: 37-55; University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-565. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2277031

Karen D. Hughes (Contact Author)

University of Alberta - Department of Strategic Management and Organization ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada

Graham S. Lowe

University of Alberta - Department of Sociology ( email )

5-21 HM Tory Building
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H4
Cananda
780-492-0487 (Phone)

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