Barnard's Regret: Zones of Accountability and the Limits of Authority

"Barnard's Regret: Zones of Accountability and the Limits of Authority," with Jonathan B. Justice. Public Integrity, Forthcoming

32 Pages Posted: 15 Jun 2013

See all articles by Melvin Dubnick

Melvin Dubnick

University of New Hampshire

Jonathan B. Justice

University of Delaware, School of Public Policy & Administration

Date Written: January 23, 2013

Abstract

Two decades after publishing Functions of the Executive, Chester Barnard argued that moral responsibility constitutes a more powerful principle than executive authority for guiding organizations. This article elaborates one direction in which Barnard might have developed this insight, positing ethical acceptance rather than self‐interested indifference as the basis for harmonizing individual choices and organizational needs. Executives can enhance performance by recognizing, understanding and (re)designing organizational spaces of accountability and discretion.

Keywords: accountability, moral responsibility, Chester Barnard, management theory, organizations, discretion, executive authority

Suggested Citation

Dubnick, Melvin and Justice, Jonathan B., Barnard's Regret: Zones of Accountability and the Limits of Authority (January 23, 2013). "Barnard's Regret: Zones of Accountability and the Limits of Authority," with Jonathan B. Justice. Public Integrity, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2279186

Melvin Dubnick (Contact Author)

University of New Hampshire ( email )

20 Academic Way
Horton Hall
Durham, NH 03824
United States

HOME PAGE: http://mjdubnick.dubnick.net

Jonathan B. Justice

University of Delaware, School of Public Policy & Administration ( email )

Newark, DE 19716
United States

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