While Parents Might Not Want to, Researchers Really Should Ask Questions About Risky Behaviors

Journal of Consumer Psychology, Volume 18, Issue 2, 1 April 2008, Pages 111–115

University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-1100

Posted: 29 Mar 2019

See all articles by Sarah Moore

Sarah Moore

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law

Gavan J. Fitzsimons

Duke University - Fuqua School of Business

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

In this reply, we focus on two major issues raised by our commentators. First, we deal with some empirical issues about whether asking questions really increases risky behavior. We argue that the results reviewed in our target article are valid, and are not due to lab-specific effects, or to question-wording or question-answering issues. Second, we tackle some issues related to the process by which questions might increase risky behavior. We focus on two mechanisms that seem promising for explaining the influence of questions on risky behavior: attitude activation and social norms. We also consider the impact of various moderators on the risky question-behavior effect, building on suggestions made in the commentaries. Finally, we make some suggestions about techniques that we—as parents, practitioners, and researchers—might use to reduce the impact of asking questions about risky behavior.

Suggested Citation

Moore, Sarah and Fitzsimons, Gavan J., While Parents Might Not Want to, Researchers Really Should Ask Questions About Risky Behaviors (2008). Journal of Consumer Psychology, Volume 18, Issue 2, 1 April 2008, Pages 111–115; University of Alberta School of Business Research Paper No. 2013-1100. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2280741

Sarah Moore (Contact Author)

University of Alberta - Department of Marketing, Business Economics & Law ( email )

Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R6
Canada

Gavan J. Fitzsimons

Duke University - Fuqua School of Business ( email )

Box 90120
Durham, NC 27708-0120
United States

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