How College Students Use the Web to Conduct Everyday Life Research

First Monday, Vol. 16, No. 4, April 4, 2011

26 Pages Posted: 19 Jun 2013

See all articles by Alison Head

Alison Head

Project Information Literacy; University of Washington - The Information School

Michael Eisenberg

University of Washington - The Information School

Date Written: April 4, 2011

Abstract

This paper reports on college students’ everyday life information-seeking behavior, and is based on findings from 8,353 survey respondents on 25 U.S. college campuses. A large majority of respondents had looked for news and, to a slightly lesser extent, decision-making information about purchases and health and wellness within the previous six months. Almost all the respondents used search engines, though students planning to purchase something were more likely to use search engines, and those looking for spiritual information were least likely to use search engines. Despite the widespread use of search engines, the process of filtering relevant from non-relevant search results was reportedly the most difficult part of everyday life research. As a whole, these students used a hybrid information-seeking strategy for meeting their everyday life information needs, turning to search engines almost as much as they did to friends and family. A preliminary theory is introduced that describes the relationship between students’ evaluation practices and their risk-associated searches.

Suggested Citation

Head, Alison and Eisenberg, Michael, How College Students Use the Web to Conduct Everyday Life Research (April 4, 2011). First Monday, Vol. 16, No. 4, April 4, 2011 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2281533

Alison Head (Contact Author)

Project Information Literacy ( email )

c/o The Information School, Univ. of Washington
Mary Gates Hall, Ste 370
Seattle, CA, WA 98195-2840
United States

HOME PAGE: http://projectinfolit.org

University of Washington - The Information School

WA

Michael Eisenberg

University of Washington - The Information School ( email )

Box 353350
Seattle, WA 98195
United States

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