Unfinished Business: Ongoing Ethical Exceptionalism in the Oversight of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research in Canada

19 Accountability in Research 13, 2012

Posted: 28 Jun 2013

See all articles by Françoise Baylis

Françoise Baylis

Dalhousie University

Jocelyn Downie

Schulich School of Law & Faculty of Medicine

Date Written: 2012

Abstract

In this article, we critically examine the arguments for and against the exceptional status given human pluripotent stem cell research in Canada (through the latest [December 2010] revision of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans), and conclude that this exceptionalism is unwarranted and ethically unsound. In our view, the three federal research granting agencies should honor their longstanding commitment that researchers, research sponsors, and Research Ethics Boards in Canada have access to “a single reference document for all research involving humans conducted under the auspices of institutions eligible for Agency funding.” As well, responsibility for the development, interpretation, and implementation of Canada’s research ethics guidelines should be under the authority of a single oversight body that is independent of the federal research granting Agencies.

Keywords: ethics guidelines, governance, oversight, research ethics, stem cells

Suggested Citation

Baylis, Françoise and Downie, Jocelyn, Unfinished Business: Ongoing Ethical Exceptionalism in the Oversight of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research in Canada (2012). 19 Accountability in Research 13, 2012, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2286266

Françoise Baylis

Dalhousie University ( email )

6225 University Avenue
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H7
Canada

Jocelyn Downie (Contact Author)

Schulich School of Law & Faculty of Medicine ( email )

Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H9
Canada

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