Proposing the Hedonic Affect Model (HAM) to Explain How Stimuli and Performance Expectations Predict Affect in Individual and Group Hedonic Systems Use

Proceedings of the Journal of the Association for Information Systems Theory Development Workshop at the International Conference on Systems Sciences, Paris, France, December 13. All Sprouts Content, vol. 8(24), paper 230, pp. 1-51

59 Pages Posted: 30 Jun 2013

See all articles by Paul Benjamin Lowry

Paul Benjamin Lowry

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University - Pamplin College of Business

Jeffrey L. Jenkins

University of Arizona

James Gaskin

Brigham Young University - Marriott School; Case Western Reserve University - Department of Information Systems

Bryan Hammer

University of Arkansas - Department of Information Systems

Nathan Twyman

University of Arizona - Department of Management Information Systems

Martin Hassell

University of Arkansas

Date Written: June 30, 2013

Abstract

Hedonic systems represent a multibillion-dollar industry and play an important role in how people recreate, socialize, and even conduct business. A key goal of hedonic system design is to promote positive affectâ, €”a variable known to influence cognitive beliefs, trust, disclosure, adoption, and purchase intentions. Yet, little research has identified or explained how stimuli from design features lead to positive affect in hedonic systems. This article introduces a new theoretical model, the Hedonic Affect Model (HAM), which is a comprehensive and generalizable model explaining the causes of positive and negative affect in a hedonic software context. HAM outlines three stages that provide an explanation of how stimuli lead to positive affect in hedonic contexts. In stage 1, HAM specifies group and individual interaction inputs that are likely to play a role in users' hedonic evaluations of a system. Stage 2 explains how the interaction inputs and intrinsic motivation influence hedonic performance perceptions. Stage 3 explains how performance expectations and perceived performance lead to a positive disconfirmation and influence users' affect.

Keywords: affect, expectations disconfirmation, stimulus, attention, perceived affective quality, hedonic systems

Suggested Citation

Lowry, Paul Benjamin and Jenkins, Jeffrey L. and Gaskin, James and Hammer, Bryan and Twyman, Nathan and Hassell, Martin, Proposing the Hedonic Affect Model (HAM) to Explain How Stimuli and Performance Expectations Predict Affect in Individual and Group Hedonic Systems Use (June 30, 2013). Proceedings of the Journal of the Association for Information Systems Theory Development Workshop at the International Conference on Systems Sciences, Paris, France, December 13. All Sprouts Content, vol. 8(24), paper 230, pp. 1-51. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2287401

Paul Benjamin Lowry (Contact Author)

Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University - Pamplin College of Business ( email )

1016 Pamplin Hall
Blacksburg, VA 24061
United States

Jeffrey L. Jenkins

University of Arizona ( email )

Department of History
Tucson, AZ 85721
United States

James Gaskin

Brigham Young University - Marriott School ( email )

United States

Case Western Reserve University - Department of Information Systems ( email )

United States

Bryan Hammer

University of Arkansas - Department of Information Systems ( email )

United States

Nathan Twyman

University of Arizona - Department of Management Information Systems ( email )

AZ
United States

Martin Hassell

University of Arkansas ( email )

Fayetteville, AR 72701
United States

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