A Case for Compulsory Legal Ethics Education in Canadian Law Schools

20 Dalhousie Law Journal 224 (1997)

13 Pages Posted: 5 Jul 2013

See all articles by Jocelyn Downie

Jocelyn Downie

Schulich School of Law & Faculty of Medicine

Date Written: 1997

Abstract

The author presents principled arguments, consequentialist arguments, arguments by analogy and arguments by authority in support of her conclusion that Canadian law schools should have compulsory legal ethics education. Among other things, she argues that legal ethics education is an imperfect but essential way to meet the obligations that arise from the public trust placed in the legal profession. She also explores a number of benefits that can accrue to students, law schools, the legal profession and society in general when ethics is a compulsory component of legal education.

Keywords: ethics, legal education, law school

Suggested Citation

Downie, Jocelyn, A Case for Compulsory Legal Ethics Education in Canadian Law Schools (1997). 20 Dalhousie Law Journal 224 (1997). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2289775

Jocelyn Downie (Contact Author)

Schulich School of Law & Faculty of Medicine ( email )

Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4H9
Canada

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