Redistricting and Individual Contributions to Congressional Candidates

33 Pages Posted: 8 Aug 2013

See all articles by Michael Crespin

Michael Crespin

University of Texas at Dallas - School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences

Barry Edwards

University of Georgia - School of Public and International Affairs

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

In this paper, we use redistricting to examine the relationship between representatives and a unique group of the public: individual campaign contributors. By way of a continuous measure of district change, we examine 20 years of congressional elections data to test how incumbent campaign fundraising activity changes after redistricting. We find that as the geographic constituency changes, members receive larger shares of contributions from outside their districts. When we look at the parties separately, the immediate effect is larger for Republicans but returns to pre-redistricting behavior in the last period before districts change again. The impact is smaller for Democrats but remains significant in each election after redistricting. This result is important because contributors who reside outside Fenno’s concentric circles of representation are different than other donors. In addition, larger shares of outside donations are positively correlated with more extreme voting behavior.e provided by author.

Keywords: redistricting, elections, campaign finance

Suggested Citation

Crespin, Michael and Edwards, Barry, Redistricting and Individual Contributions to Congressional Candidates (2013). APSA 2013 Annual Meeting Paper, American Political Science Association 2013 Annual Meeting, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2300330

Michael Crespin (Contact Author)

University of Texas at Dallas - School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences ( email )

P.O. Box 830688, GR 31
Richardson, TX 75083
United States

Barry Edwards

University of Georgia - School of Public and International Affairs ( email )

Athens, GA 30602-6254
United States