Racial Cues, Prejudice and Attitudes Toward Redistribution: A Comparative Experimental Approach

25 Pages Posted: 27 Aug 2013  

Stuart N. Soroka

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - College of Literature, Science & the Arts

Allison Harell

Université du Québec à Montréal

Shanto Iyengar

Stanford University - Department of Communication

Date Written: 2013

Abstract

Past work suggests that support for welfare in the US is heavily influenced by citizens’ racial attitudes. Indeed, the idea that many Americans think of welfare recipients as poor Blacks (and especially as poor Black women) has been a common explanation for Americans’ comparatively low support for redistribution. In this study, we extend existing work on how racialized portrayals of recipients affect attitudes toward redistribution. The data for the analysis are drawn from a new and unique online survey experiment, implemented by YouGov Polimetrix and conducted with national samples in the US, UK and Canada. Through a series of survey vignettes, we experimentally manipulate the ethno-racial background of policy beneficiaries for various types of redistributive programs. By exploring whether citizens respond to other minority groups (Asians, Hispanics, South Asians and Native Americans) in a manner similar to Blacks, our results provide a cross-national extension of the American literature. We also provide an extension across policy domains by examining whether racial cues affect other welfare state policy domains. Finally, we also consider the relative impact of three different measures of overt, modern, and implicit racism.

Suggested Citation

Soroka, Stuart N. and Harell, Allison and Iyengar, Shanto, Racial Cues, Prejudice and Attitudes Toward Redistribution: A Comparative Experimental Approach (2013). APSA 2013 Annual Meeting Paper; American Political Science Association 2013 Annual Meeting. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2303284

Stuart N. Soroka (Contact Author)

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - College of Literature, Science & the Arts ( email )

Ann Arbor, MI
United States

Allison Harell

Université du Québec à Montréal ( email )

PB 8888 Station DownTown
Succursale Centre Ville
Montreal, Quebec H3C3P8
Canada

Shanto Iyengar

Stanford University - Department of Communication ( email )

CA
United States
650-723-5509 (Phone)
650-723-6933 (Fax)

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