A Libertarian Theory of Immigration

Journal of Libertarian Studies: An Interdisciplinary Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 167-186, Summer 1998

Posted: 11 Sep 2000

See all articles by Walter E. Block

Walter E. Block

Loyola University New Orleans - Joseph A. Butt, S.J. College of Business

Abstract

Libertarianism is the view that all behavior should be allowed, with the one exception that threatened or actual violence against a person or his legitimately owned property should be proscribed. So, is immigration per se an invasive act? Of course not. The claims that immigrants are like invaders in that they can vote, go on welfare, commit crimes, take away jobs from citizens, are either factually incorrect, or can be countered by elimating the offending institutions (e.g., welfare). If these arguments were correct, moreover, they would mitigate against giving birth to babies, for, in a dozen or two dozen years, newborns can be "guilty" of all charges now made against immigrants. This being the case, the libertarian view on immigration, as it is on free trade and the international movement of goods, is one of laissez faire.

Suggested Citation

Block, Walter E., A Libertarian Theory of Immigration. Journal of Libertarian Studies: An Interdisciplinary Review, Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 167-186, Summer 1998. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=230876

Walter E. Block (Contact Author)

Loyola University New Orleans - Joseph A. Butt, S.J. College of Business ( email )

6363 St. Charles Avenue
Box 15, Miller 321
New Orleans, LA 70118
United States
(504) 864-7944 (Phone)
(504) 864-7970 (Fax)

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