'Queasy Does It': False Alcohol Beliefs and Memories May Lead to Diminished Alcohol Preferences

Acta Psychologica, Vol. 143, 2013, pp. 14-19

UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2013-130

7 Pages Posted: 16 Aug 2013  

Seema L. Clifasefi

University of Washington, Center for the Study of Health and Risk Behavior

Daniel M. Bernstein

Kwantlen Polytechnic University; University of Washington

Antonia Mantonakis

Brock University, Department of Marketing, International Business and Strategy

Elizabeth F. Loftus

University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior; University of California, Irvine School of Law

Date Written: January 30, 2013

Abstract

Studies have shown that false memories can be implanted via innocuous suggestions, and that these memories can play a role in shaping people's subsequent attitudes and preferences. The current study explored whether participants (N=147) who received a false suggestion that they had become ill drinking a particular type of alcohol would increase their confidence that the event had occurred, and whether their new-found belief would subsequently affect their alcohol preferences. Results indicated that participants who received a suggestion that they had gotten sick drinking rumor vodka before the age of 16 reported increased confidence that the suggested experience had occurred.Moreover, participants who received a false alcohol suggestion also showed a strong trend to report diminished preference for the specified type of alcohol after the false suggestion. Implantation of a false memory related to one's past drinking experiences may influence current drink preferences and could be an important avenue for further exploration in the development of alcohol interventions.

Keywords: False memories, Alcohol

Suggested Citation

Clifasefi, Seema L. and Bernstein, Daniel M. and Mantonakis, Antonia and Loftus, Elizabeth F., 'Queasy Does It': False Alcohol Beliefs and Memories May Lead to Diminished Alcohol Preferences (January 30, 2013). Acta Psychologica, Vol. 143, 2013, pp. 14-19; UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2013-130. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2310379

Seema L. Clifasefi (Contact Author)

University of Washington, Center for the Study of Health and Risk Behavior ( email )

Seattle, WA 98195
United States

Daniel M. Bernstein

Kwantlen Polytechnic University ( email )

12666-72nd Avenue
Surrey, British Columbia V3W 2M8
Canada
604-599-3372 (Phone)

University of Washington ( email )

Seattle, WA 98195
United States
206 616-6107 (Phone)

Antonia Mantonakis

Brock University, Department of Marketing, International Business and Strategy ( email )

Department of Marketing
International Business and Strategy
St. Catherines
Canada

Elizabeth F. Loftus

University of California, Irvine - Department of Psychology and Social Behavior ( email )

4201 Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, CA 92697-7085
United States

University of California, Irvine School of Law

401 E. Peltason Dr.
Ste. 1000
Irvine, CA 92697-1000
United States

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