US Male Obesity from 1800-2000: A Long Term Perspective

36 Pages Posted: 30 Aug 2013

See all articles by Scott Alan Carson

Scott Alan Carson

University of Texas of the Permian Basin; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Date Written: August 29, 2013

Abstract

This study compares two US BMI data sets, one from the 1800s and the other from the early 2000s, to determine how black and white male obesity rates varied between 1800 and 2000. The proportion of individuals who were obese rather than overweight is responsible much of the increase in obesity. Because of their physical activity and close proximity to nutritious diets, farmers had greater BMI values than workers in other occupations; however, since the 19th century, physically less active white-collar and skilled workers have become more obese. Northeastern obesity rates are lower than from elsewhere within the US, while Midwestern BMIs increased and western BMIs decreased.

Keywords: BMIs, US obesity epidemic, long-term health, obesity by race

JEL Classification: I100, I120, J110, J150, N300

Suggested Citation

Carson, Scott Alan, US Male Obesity from 1800-2000: A Long Term Perspective (August 29, 2013). CESifo Working Paper Series No. 4366. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2317764

Scott Alan Carson (Contact Author)

University of Texas of the Permian Basin ( email )

4901 East University
Odessa, TX 79762
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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