How Television Went Digital in the Netherlands

Mapping Digital Media: Reference Series No. 11, Sept. 2011

20 Pages Posted: 11 Sep 2013

See all articles by Nico Van Eijk

Nico Van Eijk

University of Amsterdam

Bart van der Sloot

Tilburg University - Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society (TILT)

Date Written: September 2011

Abstract

The Netherlands was the second country in Europe to switch off traditional analog television. On December 11, 2006, some three months after Luxembourg had taken this step, the analog terrestrial signal was switched off and the same frequencies are now primarily used for digital broadcasting. The Netherlands was and is a densely cabled country. The fact that less than 1.5 percent of households were dependent on analog terrestrial television was the key precondition for the successful switch-over. After describing the background of switch-over, this paper summarizes the development of digital television in the Netherlands, analyzing such key policy issues as: technical decisions on access for public television, the allocation of broadcasting licenses, license conditions, roll-out obligations, and issues with regard to regional broadcasting organizations. In conclusion, the authors consider the effects of switch-over on the Dutch media landscape.

Keywords: television, broadcasting, switch-off, switch-over, digital

Suggested Citation

Van Eijk, Nico and van der Sloot, Bart, How Television Went Digital in the Netherlands (September 2011). Mapping Digital Media: Reference Series No. 11, Sept. 2011 , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2323750

Nico Van Eijk

University of Amsterdam ( email )

Spui 21
Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands

Bart Van der Sloot (Contact Author)

Tilburg University - Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society (TILT) ( email )

P.O.Box 90153
Prof. Cobbenhagenlaan 221
Tilburg, 5037
Netherlands

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
59
Abstract Views
444
Rank
675,522
PlumX Metrics